Original OverDrive App Update

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As you have probably heard, the original OverDrive app is being discontinued to help libraries welcome more users to Libby. The goal is to simplify how libraries promote digital collections, train staff, and support users.

OverDrive recently shared an update regarding the status of the original OverDrive app (which was officially removed from app stores last February).

Upcoming steps from OverDrive

  • OverDrive plans to fully discontinue the OverDrive app in early 2023. In the meantime, library staff are being asked to actively encourage OverDrive app users to switch to Libby.
  • Starting the week of July 25, the following message will be displayed to users in the OverDrive app:
In early 2023, the OverDrive app will be discontinued. Upgrade to Libby today. In Libby, you'll find the same great titles from your library, in a beautiful, modern, easy-to-use app. Your loans, holds, and wish list items will be waiting for you in Libby. Have a Kindle Fire tablet? Learn how to install Libby.

Later this year, this in-app message will be updated to remind users about this change. Libraries will receive advance notice and more information ahead of this update.

But What About Fire Tablet Users?

Great question! While Amazon has not yet accepted OverDrive’s submission of the Libby app to the Amazon Appstore, Kindle Fire users can now download the app onto their device manually. This work-around is supported on Fire tablets running Fire OS 5 and up.

Fire tablet users who do not wish to install the app manually can also use LibbyApp.com. This browser-based version functions almost exactly like the Libby app.

Additional Resources

OverDrive encourages library staff to use the following resources to help your library and users through this transition:

For library staff:

For users:

-Richelle Klug @ Sewickley Public Library

Continue ReadingOriginal OverDrive App Update

eTips for Library Patrons

Do you often have patrons ask you what the best library app is or what they should use to access library materials from home?

Well the Digital Resource Committee (the librarians you see post here) are here to help and we even have an updated eTips handout for you to use! You can access this handy tip sheet via this website. Just click on Marketing Materials at the top of this page and then scroll down to the eTips handout where you can print off these handy sheets to give to patrons whenever the are struggling to pick the app that best suits their needs.

You can also click the link above to be taken directly to the eTips Handout!

-Adrianne, Northland Public Library

Continue ReadingeTips for Library Patrons

Some (hopefully) New-To-You Titles To Read and Listen to This Winter

Winter is such a generous reading season – it lends itself so well to staying in bed, cozying up on the couch, grabbing a favorite wintery warm beverage and getting lost in a book. While many of us reach for familiar titles and genres (I happily re-read Rosamund Pilcher’s Winter Solstice every winter!) this season, consider trying something out of your normal reading zone. I’ve been participating (loosely, I admit) in Book Riot’s Read Harder Challenges for 2 years now and they’ve gotten me into titles I’d never have picked up on my own. Here are a few that may move you into some exciting and unfamiliar territory:

  • Kaveh Akbar’s Calling a Wolf a Wolf. I know, I know, it’s poetry, but stay with me. I know that’s very, very scary. But this is one of the best books of poetry I’ve read in recent years (I’m a poet and I read a lot of it!) and it’s highly accessible. The entire book is about Akbar’s journey with alcoholism. It’s deft, thought-provoking, mysterious and beautiful. This is NOT your high school English class poetry! If you dig that book, try Ada Limon’s The Carrying (available on Hoopla). 
Calling a Wolf a Wolf
  • Some of us read all fiction and some of us read all nonfiction! I place myself in both camps, but if you’re a real fiction lover and want to dip your toe into the world of nonfiction, try World of Wonders: In Praise of Fireflies, Whale Sharks and Other Astonishments. It’s a short book of very beautiful, poetic essays by Aimee Nezhukumatathil (available on Hoopla). Or really lean in and try a graphic novel memoir! You can do this! The Best We Could Do is a perfect entry into the world of comic-strip -form books. It’s a memoir about Vietnam immigrants after the fall of South Vietnam in the 1970s by Thi Bui. She’s also illustrated a gorgeous picture book, The Pond that I’d highly recommend for both the kiddos and their grownups! And finally, try The Rise of Wolf 8: Witnessing the Triumph of Yellowstone’s Underdog by Rick McIntyre, also available on Hoopla. Fascinating story of the abundant return of the once-rare wild wolves to Yellowstone National Park. 
World of Wonders
  • If you fall solidly in that other camp (geeks unite!), try Anna and the Swallow Man by Gavriel Savit. If you loved The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak (and who didn’t!) you’ll love Savit’s beautiful and heartbreaking Holocaust novel. The audio (which won ALA’s prestigious Odyssey Award for best audiobook for children in 2017) and the e-book are both currently available. In the too-scared-to-go-to-sleep fiction sub-genre, Zoje Stage got some fame for her unnerving book, Baby Teeth (great book!) and her newest does not disappoint. Wonderland is a true wintery tale that will chill you to the bone. Finally, give Ann Patchett a spin. All of her books are heart-eyes! Her newest book, in audio-form, The Dutch House read by Tom Hanks is perfection.
The Dutch House
  • 2020 has been quite a year and there are plenty of suggestions out there on how to soothe and calm yourself during this very trying time. I find listening to and reading children’s books to be one of the most soothing. Remember bedtime stories? Or storytime at the library? I actually never was read to OR taken to storytime (and my father was an English teacher and a librarian, for shame!) but I can imagine how nice it would have been and so I happily create that sensation for myself now as an adult. I recently listened to Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia Maclachlan, a classic children’s book (and a beautiful film starring Glenn Close as Sarah). Close is also the narrator of the whole collection (3 books total) available on Hoopla. The Anne of Green Gables series is another sure-to-soothe set. Various audio versions available here on Libby and on Hoopla aren’t my favorite (truly, the Audible version read by Rachel McAdams is the very best and it’s currently free!) but the others will do in a pinch. Right now I’m listening to Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary read by Stockard Channing (brilliant and available on Hoopla!) I’d also highly recommend Pax by Sara Pennypacker, a sweet little book about a boy and his fox also on Hoopla. Set the handy timer on the Hoopla app and drift off into a dreamy sleep. 
Pax

Hope these titles help you create some warmth, delight and joy this winter!

Continue ReadingSome (hopefully) New-To-You Titles To Read and Listen to This Winter

Just never got started with OverDrive?

Why not try it now?

While diving in and just plain using OverDrive yourself to request, borrow, read, and return items is probably the best way to learn it, there are free webcasts available that can help to introduce you to it and/or Libby:

https://resources.overdrive.com/library/staff-training/#live-webcasts

There are several tabs for different subjects — some are upcoming live webcasts, but most are recorded and can be viewed at any time.  The webcasts generally range from 10 to 30 minutes.

If you’re new to OverDrive, you can safely skip anything about Marketplace — it’s basically the store where libraries (or consortia) purchase titles for patrons to borrow.

Christy @ McKeesport

Continue ReadingJust never got started with OverDrive?